Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 3rd International Conference and Exhibition on Addiction Research & Therapy Chicago, USA.

Day 2 :

OMICS International Addiction Therapy-2014 International Conference Keynote Speaker Kenneth Blum photo
Biography:

Kenneth Blum is widely designated as Father of Psychiatric Genetics because of the DRD2 gene and its correlation with various psychiatric disorders including the “Reward Deficiency Syndrome” (RDS), a term coined by him. He is also known as the “Father of Neuro- Nutrient Therapy for his discovery of successful nutrient therapy for RDS. He holds numerous domestic and foreign patents and is co-founder and Chairman and CSO of LifeGen Inc. He is a former Full Professor in the Department of Pharmacology, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, Texas; Volunteer Professor in the Department of Psychiatry & McKnight Brain Institute, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, Florida and Adjunct Full Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Vermont College of Medicine, Burlington, Vermont. He currently serves as Neuroscience advisor for Dominion Diagnostics., LLC North Kingstown, Rhode island, Malibu Beach Recovery Center, Malibu Beach California, and is the Scientific Director of PATH Foundation NY, New York. He is an honorary Faculty of IIOAB, India. He has been recently appointed Chief Scientific Officer (CSO) of G&G Holistic Addiction Treatment Centers in North Miami Beach Florida. To his credit he has over 400 publications in peer reviewed journals, 14 books and has received many awards including a Lifetime Achievement Award from the National Institute of Holistic Addiction Studies.

Abstract:

Treatment outcomes may improve with accurate stratification of genetic addiction risk and scientifically accurate drug urine analysis; monitoring for compliance (Comp) to FDA approved medication(s) and abstinence (Abs) from drugs of abuse. Resting state functional magnetic imaging (rsfMRI) has been used to determine the impact of drugs like alcohol and heroin on functional connectivity of the brain reward circuitry. Study S1 is genetic addiction risk (GARS) stratification for Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS). The genetic polymorphisms [DRD1=G; DRD2=AI; DRD3=C; DRD4=C; DAT1=9R; DRD4=7-11R; HTTLPR=S or Lg; MAOA=3.5-5R; COMT=G; OPRM1=G; and GABRB3=181] most associated in addiction literature with RDS risk were tested and compared to Addiction Severity Index -Media Version (ASI-MV). S2 was a longitudinal statistical analysis of data from the Comprehensive Analysis of Reported Drugs (CARD) in patients (n=10,570) from chemical dependency programs. Comp and Abs was quantified in three groups: Medication Assisted Therapy (MAT) N=510; Methadone (MTD) N= 633 and Suboxone (SUBX) N=1299. S3 rsfMRI was used to test KB220Z a nutraceutical-dopamine agonist in rats using a segmented brain atlas S1. The percentage-prevalence of risk alleles was calculated and severity ranked in 223 subjects. All subjects tested positive for RDS risk alleles [40.4% with 9 or more; 30.9% with 7 or 8; 28.7% with 6 or less]. Utilizing chi2 analysis, a predictive association between mixed gender individuals with 7 or higher risk alleles and ASI alcohol severity was significant (c2=8.38, df=1, P<0.004). Logistic regression suggests age (b=0.45, S.E.=0.11, Wald c2=15.29, df=1, p<0.001) and age + greater number of RDS risk alleles (b=0.741, S.E.=0.29, Wald c2=6.39, df=1, p=0.012) remained significant. S2. Improvement was significant: MAT: Comp (p=2.2x10-16), Abs (p=2.4x10-8); MTD: Comp (P<2.2x10-16), Abs (p=1.5x10-6) and SUBX: Comp (p=2.2x10-16), Abs (p=2.2x1016). Specifically, Comp to MTD [N=609] was 92% and SUBX [N=1135] was 87.4%; Abs from MTD was 52.7%; Abs from SUBX was 51% from the first and last urine tested. Longitudinal analyses revealed significantly reduced opiate abuse during treatment for both MTD (21.5%) and SUBX (18%). S3 KB220Z above placebo significantly increased BOLD functional connectivity and induced increases in brain volume recruitment in seed regions of interest (ROIs) across the brain reward circuitry S1. The GARS panel has been significantly associated with the alcohol severity score of the ASI and can provide information central to the implementation of relapse prevention and appropriate pain and addiction treatment S2. Subjects Comp to prescribed medications, were more likely to be Abs during treatment (p=0.0012; odds ratio=1.69 with 95% confidence interval (1.210, 2.354). Reduced opiate abuse during MTD and SUBX standard treatment should ameliorate opiate diversion and the need for US government restrictions S3. KB220Z above placebo increased reward regional connectivity, potentially enhancing homeostatic dopaminergic function. This response to KB220Z is selective and quite robust implying clinical relevance as an opioid substitution modality. Analysis of GARS as a predictor of opioid risk is underway. These study results have revealed solutions that can be directed to the treatment of RDS behaviors.

Keynote Forum

Mary Hauser

Dominion Diagnostics, USA

Keynote: Comprehensive Analysis of Reported Drugs (CARD)™

Time : 09:00-09:40

OMICS International Addiction Therapy-2014 International Conference Keynote Speaker Mary Hauser photo
Biography:

Mary Hauser has over 40 years of Addiction and Behavioral Health field experience including directing prevention, intervention, treatment and research programs; serving as adjunct faculty at multiple universities; and serving as a consultant at the State, Federal and Inpatient/Outpatient program level. Ms. Hauser has a Masters Degree in Psychology and has lectured and trained extensively around the country. Since 1999, Ms. Hauser has been the Vice President of the Addiction Services Division at Dominion Diagnostics.

Abstract:

Treatment outcomes may improve with accurate stratification of genetic addiction risk and scientifically accurate drug urine analysis; monitoring for compliance (Comp) to FDA approved medication(s) and abstinence (Abs) from drugs of abuse. Resting state functional magnetic imaging (rsfMRI) has been used to determine the impact of drugs like alcohol and heroin on functional connectivity of the brain reward circuitry. Study S1 is genetic addiction risk (GARS) stratification for Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS). The genetic polymorphisms [DRD1=G; DRD2=AI; DRD3=C; DRD4=C; DAT1=9R; DRD4=7-11R; HTTLPR=S or Lg; MAOA=3.5-5R; COMT=G; OPRM1=G; and GABRB3=181] most associated in addiction literature with RDS risk were tested and compared to Addiction Severity Index -Media Version (ASI-MV). S2 was a longitudinal statistical analysis of data from the Comprehensive Analysis of Reported Drugs (CARD) in patients (n=10,570) from chemical dependency programs. Comp and Abs was quantified in three groups: Medication Assisted Therapy (MAT) N=510; Methadone (MTD) N= 633 and Suboxone (SUBX) N=1299. S3 rsfMRI was used to test KB220Z a nutraceutical-dopamine agonist in rats using a segmented brain atlas S1. The percentage-prevalence of risk alleles was calculated and severity ranked in 223 subjects. All subjects tested positive for RDS risk alleles [40.4% with 9 or more; 30.9% with 7 or 8; 28.7% with 6 or less]. Utilizing chi2 analysis, a predictive association between mixed gender individuals with 7 or higher risk alleles and ASI alcohol severity was significant (c2=8.38, df=1, P<0.004). Logistic regression suggests age (b=0.45, S.E.=0.11, Wald c2=15.29, df=1, p<0.001) and age + greater number of RDS risk alleles (b=0.741, S.E.=0.29, Wald c2=6.39, df=1, p=0.012) remained significant. S2. Improvement was significant: MAT: Comp (p=2.2x10-16), Abs (p=2.4x10-8); MTD: Comp (P<2.2x10-16), Abs (p=1.5x10-6) and SUBX: Comp (p=2.2x10-16), Abs (p=2.2x1016). Specifically, Comp to MTD [N=609] was 92% and SUBX [N=1135] was 87.4%; Abs from MTD was 52.7%; Abs from SUBX was 51% from the first and last urine tested. Longitudinal analyses revealed significantly reduced opiate abuse during treatment for both MTD (21.5%) and SUBX (18%). S3 KB220Z above placebo significantly increased BOLD functional connectivity and induced increases in brain volume recruitment in seed regions of interest (ROIs) across the brain reward circuitry S1. The GARS panel has been significantly associated with the alcohol severity score of the ASI and can provide information central to the implementation of relapse prevention and appropriate pain and addiction treatment S2. Subjects Comp to prescribed medications, were more likely to be Abs during treatment (p=0.0012; odds ratio=1.69 with 95% confidence interval (1.210, 2.354). Reduced opiate abuse during MTD and SUBX standard treatment should ameliorate opiate diversion and the need for US government restrictions S3. KB220Z above placebo increased reward regional connectivity, potentially enhancing homeostatic dopaminergic function. This response to KB220Z is selective and quite robust implying clinical relevance as an opioid substitution modality. Analysis of GARS as a predictor of opioid risk is underway. These study results have revealed solutions that can be directed to the treatment of RDS behaviors.

OMICS International Addiction Therapy-2014 International Conference Keynote Speaker Kathy Sexton-Radek photo
Biography:

Kathy Sexton-Radek, PhD, CBSM completed her Doctorate of Philosophy in the area of Clinical Psychology at Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago, IL in 1988. She interned at Rush Medical Center as a Behavioral Medicine Resident. She has been in academia for 26 years developing and teaching undergraduate and graduate psychology courses. Her private practice work as Director of Behavioral Health and Wellness for the last 26 years has focused on assessment and treatment in areas of sleep disorders, depression, anxiety disorders, somatic symptoms disorders and psychological factors affecting medical illness disorders. She is a Certified Behavioral Sleep Medicine specialist and has Sleep Board eligibility. \\\\r\\\\n\\\\r\\\\n

Abstract:

A summary of the behavioral interventions used to treat substance use disorder will be presented. The literature indicates efficacy with a number of approaches that are applied in the private practice and inpatient settings. The differences between the implementations of approaches will be discussed. Varying degrees of successful outcome exist by substance use disorder –substance type. The comparison to medical interventions will be made and areas of need will be identified. Finally, the some clinical impressions on future directions will be discussed.

Keynote Forum

Sara J. Nixon

University of Florida, USA

Keynote: Neurobehavioral challenges in recovery: Exploring their breadth & treatment implications

Time : 10:05-10:30

OMICS International Addiction Therapy-2014 International Conference Keynote Speaker Sara J. Nixon photo
Biography:

Sara Jo Nixon is Professor of Psychiatry and Psychology, Co-Vice Chair, Department of Psychiatry, Chief of Addiction Research, Director of the CTSI Biobehavioral Core and of the Neurocognitive Laboratory, all at the University of Florida. She has over 125 peer-reviewed articles and book chapters and has edited two books. She has made hundreds of scientific presentations and holds research awards from private, state and national sources: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, National Institute on Drug Abuse, Department of Veterans Affairs, and more. She is Past President of the Research Society on Alcoholism and the Society of Addiction Psychology.

Abstract:

Drawing on her own as well as others’ work, the author will provide an overview of current research addressing dysregulation and impairment in neurobehavioral systems associated with chronic substance abuse. Within this discussion, she will present provocative data regarding a common comorbidity among treatment-seekers, nicotine dependence and examine its acute and chronic effects. As a part of this overview, she will explore a critical, but understudied, component of neurobehavior, emotional processing; describing developing work designed to concurrently explore the two domains. Finally, the author will discuss developing treatment interventions applying our understanding of these deficits to enhance treatment compliance and long-term outcome.

Break: Coffee Break 10:30-10:50 @ Foyer

Keynote Forum

William S. Jacobs

University of Florida, USA

Keynote: Pain and addiction

Time : 10:50-11:15

OMICS International Addiction Therapy-2014 International Conference Keynote Speaker William S. Jacobs photo
Biography:

William S Jacobs, MD, is board certified in Anesthesiology, Pain Medicine, and Addiction Medicine. A Phi Beta Kappa, Magna Cum Laude University of Georgia undergraduate and graduate of the Medical College of Georgia, he did his Anesthesiology Residency at the University of Alabama-Birmingham before matriculating to UF for his Addiction Medicine Fellowship. He is currently Associate Professor in Psychiatry and Addiction Medicine: Co-Chief of Pain Medicine at the University of Florida. His work has included serving as Medical Director of multiple addiction treatment programs as well as expert witness work, consulting with state and federal agencies, authoring peer reviewed works and as on pharmacologic studies.

Abstract:

Background: Opioid abuse and dependence are significant health care provider health problems, and this is especially the case amongst anesthesia trainees and physicians. Methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) has been the most widely used maintenance treatment for decades in treating opiate addiction. But what about physician opioid addicts, even if they have identical intravenous or other elements of their history in common with other addicts do they receive the same treatment?
Methods: For 5 years, we followed all physicians who were identified by the Florida Board of Medicine and PRN for opioid abuse/dependence. Twenty-six physicians were identified in the pre-Buprenorphine era: all but ten had intravenous opioid use. They included 23 males and 3 females. Treatment referrals were made to various addiction treatment facilities and outcomes were collected.
Results: All signed PRN contracts requiring them to attend a specialized monitoring group, call a toll-free number for randomization to at least weekly urine monitoring and regularly attend a local recovery support group program. 0% were referred for MMT. 0/23 male addicts were treated with MMT. All were referred for detoxification and drug-free long-term physicians health program treatment and monitoring. As we have reported previously, physician addicts have a greater than 80% successful 5 year outcomes as assessed by written counselor reports, physician/psychiatrist evaluations, AA/NA attendance, return to work and frequent random urine testing.
Conclusion: Unlike treatment referrals for non-physicians, opioid addicted physicians are referred to detox and long-term treatment rather than MMT. Physicians may recommend MMT for others but an unusual NIMBY (not-in-my-backyard) phenomenon applies for their colleagues. The physicians behavior is to vote for detox and long-term treatment for themselves and colleagues and they may prefer this option to MMT if available for other opiate addicts.

Keynote Forum

John Femino

American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM), USA

Keynote: Coupling 12 Steps Program and Fellowship with Molecular Neurobiology: Don’t throw out the baby with the bath water

Time : 11:15-11:40

OMICS International Addiction Therapy-2014 International Conference Keynote Speaker John Femino photo
Biography:

John Femino, MD, FASAM, graduated from Brown University School of Medicine and completed residency in internal medicine and post-doctoral fellowships in clinical psychopharmacology and drug and alcohol abuse.He was the recipient of the Career Teacher in Alcohol and Drug Abuse grant at Brown University and was one of the first faculty members at the Brown University Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies, teaching in clinical faculty positions for the last 20 years. He has been on the board of directors of the Rhode Island Council on Alcoholism and has been the substance abuse consultant to major insurance companies in RI.In 1996, he founded Meadows Edge Recovery Center, a state licensed substance abuse treatment program and multidisciplinary medical and mental health group practice in North Kingstown, RI. He is a fellow of the American Society of Addiction Medicine, is board certified in internal medicine and addiction medicine and is certified as an MRO.He served as founding president of RISAM and is currently on the national ASAM Board of Directors as the New England Regional Director.He is currently a member of the Scientific Advisory of Dominion Diagnostics, LLC. RI. And is co-author of Springer Neuroscience Briefs “Molecular Neurobiology of Addiction Recovery: The 12 steps Program & Fellowship” (©2013).

Abstract:

The exploration of why 12 steps work for many has eluded the best scientific minds since its beginnings in 1933 as espoused by the “Big Book”. There have been many attempts by biological physicians to provide medical assistance to treat all addictive behaviors. Recently the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) has embraced a new definition of addiction to be based on pathological impairment of the brain reward circuitry. A subset of ASAM members known as “Like Minded Docs” are continuing their mission to couple psycho-social-spiritual modalities with evidence based psychopharmacology and genetics to assist in appropriate therapeutics and in-depth neurotransmitter genetic polymorphisms removing guess-work opening up a mirror to the brain of victims of Reward Deficiency Syndrome(RDS). Specifically this keynote address will describe the control mechanisms of addiction by utilizing AA slogans and sayings to illustrate alterations of reward circuitry and frontal lobe dysfunction on distortions of thinking, self- evaluation and choice. Through visual aids and simple to understand metaphors, Dr. Femino will link neuroimaging studies (fmRI, PET, Spec etc.) to illustrate both the genetics and pathophysiology of addiction and recovery. Coupling the neurobiological approach with understanding of the language of 12 step recovery step by step will not only laydown the foundation to be successful in patient recovery but will re-spark all those involved(e.g. clinicians, family , friends etc.). Acceptance of this proposed scientifically sound “coupling” should lead to a better quality of life for the patient during recovery-“redeeming joy” and happiness.

Keynote Forum

John J. Giordano

The National Institute Of Holistic Addiction Studies, USA

Keynote: Comprehensive holistic approaches in addiction medicine

Time : 11:40-12:05

OMICS International Addiction Therapy-2014 International Conference Keynote Speaker John J. Giordano photo
Biography:

John J. Giordano (Doctor Of Human Letters, CCJS, MAC, CAP) is an expert in the treatment of addiction and mental health and the founder of The National Institute For Holistic Addiction Studies (NIFHAS). He has nearly thirty years of recovery and twenty-eight years of addiction and mental health treatment. Giordano is the author of “Proven Holistic Treatment For Addiction & Chronic Relapse,” “How To Beat Your Addictions And live A Quality Life” and co-author of “Molecular Neurobiology of Addiction Recovery - The 12 Steps Program and Fellowship” Mr. Giordano has contributed to over sixty-five research papers published in peer-reviewed medical and scientific journals.

Abstract:

We are cognizant that addictive behaviors including alcohol and drugs present a rather high rate of relapse following treatment. To enhance treatment outcomes we developed a very comprehensive evidence –based neuroscience approach using many holistic modalities. These include but are not limited to nutrient induced reward circuitry rebalancing leading to dopaminergic homeostasis. Our program, also includes cognitive behavioral therapy, mild hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT), heavy metal toxicity monitoring, trauma release therapy, NLP, acupuncture, hypnotherapy, drumming, yoga, diet, exercise, music therapy, guided imagery, urine analysis monitoring, encouragement of 12 step program, fellowship attendance, family therapy and a strong aftercare program. Unlike other chemical treatment centers the neuroadaptagen supplements are treated like other medications and compliance monitoring is a key. One example of our continued interest in clinical outcome measures involved comparing patient demographics and relapse rates in our chemical dependence track. Increased risk for relapse and lower academic achievement were found to have a significant association in recent outcome data from a holistic treatment center (HTC) located in North Miami Beach, FL. Relapse outcomes from the Drug Addiction Treatment Outcome Study (DATOS) (n =1738) and HTC (n =224) were compared for a 12-month period. Post-discharge relapse was reported by 26% of HTC patients and 58% of patients in DATOS. Also found was a correlation between relapse and education level where the lower the academic performers showed the highest relapse rates. Our results implicate the use of vitamin and mineral supplements coupled with a well-researched natural dopamine agonist nutrient therapy; both have been shown to improve cognition and behavior, and thus academic achievement.

Break: Panel Discussion 12:05-12:45