Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 3rd International Conference and Exhibition on Addiction Research & Therapy Chicago, USA.

Day 2 :

OMICS International Addiction Therapy-2014 International Conference Keynote Speaker Kenneth Blum photo
Biography:

Kenneth Blum is widely designated as Father of Psychiatric Genetics because of the DRD2 gene and its correlation with various psychiatric disorders including the “Reward Deficiency Syndrome” (RDS), a term coined by him. He is also known as the “Father of Neuro- Nutrient Therapy for his discovery of successful nutrient therapy for RDS. He holds numerous domestic and foreign patents and is co-founder and Chairman and CSO of LifeGen Inc. He is a former Full Professor in the Department of Pharmacology, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, Texas; Volunteer Professor in the Department of Psychiatry & McKnight Brain Institute, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, Florida and Adjunct Full Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Vermont College of Medicine, Burlington, Vermont. He currently serves as Neuroscience advisor for Dominion Diagnostics., LLC North Kingstown, Rhode island, Malibu Beach Recovery Center, Malibu Beach California, and is the Scientific Director of PATH Foundation NY, New York. He is an honorary Faculty of IIOAB, India. He has been recently appointed Chief Scientific Officer (CSO) of G&G Holistic Addiction Treatment Centers in North Miami Beach Florida. To his credit he has over 400 publications in peer reviewed journals, 14 books and has received many awards including a Lifetime Achievement Award from the National Institute of Holistic Addiction Studies.

Abstract:

Treatment outcomes may improve with accurate stratification of genetic addiction risk and scientifically accurate drug urine analysis; monitoring for compliance (Comp) to FDA approved medication(s) and abstinence (Abs) from drugs of abuse. Resting state functional magnetic imaging (rsfMRI) has been used to determine the impact of drugs like alcohol and heroin on functional connectivity of the brain reward circuitry. Study S1 is genetic addiction risk (GARS) stratification for Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS). The genetic polymorphisms [DRD1=G; DRD2=AI; DRD3=C; DRD4=C; DAT1=9R; DRD4=7-11R; HTTLPR=S or Lg; MAOA=3.5-5R; COMT=G; OPRM1=G; and GABRB3=181] most associated in addiction literature with RDS risk were tested and compared to Addiction Severity Index -Media Version (ASI-MV). S2 was a longitudinal statistical analysis of data from the Comprehensive Analysis of Reported Drugs (CARD) in patients (n=10,570) from chemical dependency programs. Comp and Abs was quantified in three groups: Medication Assisted Therapy (MAT) N=510; Methadone (MTD) N= 633 and Suboxone (SUBX) N=1299. S3 rsfMRI was used to test KB220Z a nutraceutical-dopamine agonist in rats using a segmented brain atlas S1. The percentage-prevalence of risk alleles was calculated and severity ranked in 223 subjects. All subjects tested positive for RDS risk alleles [40.4% with 9 or more; 30.9% with 7 or 8; 28.7% with 6 or less]. Utilizing chi2 analysis, a predictive association between mixed gender individuals with 7 or higher risk alleles and ASI alcohol severity was significant (c2=8.38, df=1, P<0.004). Logistic regression suggests age (b=0.45, S.E.=0.11, Wald c2=15.29, df=1, p<0.001) and age + greater number of RDS risk alleles (b=0.741, S.E.=0.29, Wald c2=6.39, df=1, p=0.012) remained significant. S2. Improvement was significant: MAT: Comp (p=2.2x10-16), Abs (p=2.4x10-8); MTD: Comp (P<2.2x10-16), Abs (p=1.5x10-6) and SUBX: Comp (p=2.2x10-16), Abs (p=2.2x1016). Specifically, Comp to MTD [N=609] was 92% and SUBX [N=1135] was 87.4%; Abs from MTD was 52.7%; Abs from SUBX was 51% from the first and last urine tested. Longitudinal analyses revealed significantly reduced opiate abuse during treatment for both MTD (21.5%) and SUBX (18%). S3 KB220Z above placebo significantly increased BOLD functional connectivity and induced increases in brain volume recruitment in seed regions of interest (ROIs) across the brain reward circuitry S1. The GARS panel has been significantly associated with the alcohol severity score of the ASI and can provide information central to the implementation of relapse prevention and appropriate pain and addiction treatment S2. Subjects Comp to prescribed medications, were more likely to be Abs during treatment (p=0.0012; odds ratio=1.69 with 95% confidence interval (1.210, 2.354). Reduced opiate abuse during MTD and SUBX standard treatment should ameliorate opiate diversion and the need for US government restrictions S3. KB220Z above placebo increased reward regional connectivity, potentially enhancing homeostatic dopaminergic function. This response to KB220Z is selective and quite robust implying clinical relevance as an opioid substitution modality. Analysis of GARS as a predictor of opioid risk is underway. These study results have revealed solutions that can be directed to the treatment of RDS behaviors.

Keynote Forum

Mary Hauser

Dominion Diagnostics, USA

Keynote: Comprehensive Analysis of Reported Drugs (CARD)™

Time : 09:00-09:40

OMICS International Addiction Therapy-2014 International Conference Keynote Speaker Mary Hauser photo
Biography:

Mary Hauser has over 40 years of Addiction and Behavioral Health field experience including directing prevention, intervention, treatment and research programs; serving as adjunct faculty at multiple universities; and serving as a consultant at the State, Federal and Inpatient/Outpatient program level. Ms. Hauser has a Masters Degree in Psychology and has lectured and trained extensively around the country. Since 1999, Ms. Hauser has been the Vice President of the Addiction Services Division at Dominion Diagnostics.

Abstract:

Treatment outcomes may improve with accurate stratification of genetic addiction risk and scientifically accurate drug urine analysis; monitoring for compliance (Comp) to FDA approved medication(s) and abstinence (Abs) from drugs of abuse. Resting state functional magnetic imaging (rsfMRI) has been used to determine the impact of drugs like alcohol and heroin on functional connectivity of the brain reward circuitry. Study S1 is genetic addiction risk (GARS) stratification for Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS). The genetic polymorphisms [DRD1=G; DRD2=AI; DRD3=C; DRD4=C; DAT1=9R; DRD4=7-11R; HTTLPR=S or Lg; MAOA=3.5-5R; COMT=G; OPRM1=G; and GABRB3=181] most associated in addiction literature with RDS risk were tested and compared to Addiction Severity Index -Media Version (ASI-MV). S2 was a longitudinal statistical analysis of data from the Comprehensive Analysis of Reported Drugs (CARD) in patients (n=10,570) from chemical dependency programs. Comp and Abs was quantified in three groups: Medication Assisted Therapy (MAT) N=510; Methadone (MTD) N= 633 and Suboxone (SUBX) N=1299. S3 rsfMRI was used to test KB220Z a nutraceutical-dopamine agonist in rats using a segmented brain atlas S1. The percentage-prevalence of risk alleles was calculated and severity ranked in 223 subjects. All subjects tested positive for RDS risk alleles [40.4% with 9 or more; 30.9% with 7 or 8; 28.7% with 6 or less]. Utilizing chi2 analysis, a predictive association between mixed gender individuals with 7 or higher risk alleles and ASI alcohol severity was significant (c2=8.38, df=1, P<0.004). Logistic regression suggests age (b=0.45, S.E.=0.11, Wald c2=15.29, df=1, p<0.001) and age + greater number of RDS risk alleles (b=0.741, S.E.=0.29, Wald c2=6.39, df=1, p=0.012) remained significant. S2. Improvement was significant: MAT: Comp (p=2.2x10-16), Abs (p=2.4x10-8); MTD: Comp (P<2.2x10-16), Abs (p=1.5x10-6) and SUBX: Comp (p=2.2x10-16), Abs (p=2.2x1016). Specifically, Comp to MTD [N=609] was 92% and SUBX [N=1135] was 87.4%; Abs from MTD was 52.7%; Abs from SUBX was 51% from the first and last urine tested. Longitudinal analyses revealed significantly reduced opiate abuse during treatment for both MTD (21.5%) and SUBX (18%). S3 KB220Z above placebo significantly increased BOLD functional connectivity and induced increases in brain volume recruitment in seed regions of interest (ROIs) across the brain reward circuitry S1. The GARS panel has been significantly associated with the alcohol severity score of the ASI and can provide information central to the implementation of relapse prevention and appropriate pain and addiction treatment S2. Subjects Comp to prescribed medications, were more likely to be Abs during treatment (p=0.0012; odds ratio=1.69 with 95% confidence interval (1.210, 2.354). Reduced opiate abuse during MTD and SUBX standard treatment should ameliorate opiate diversion and the need for US government restrictions S3. KB220Z above placebo increased reward regional connectivity, potentially enhancing homeostatic dopaminergic function. This response to KB220Z is selective and quite robust implying clinical relevance as an opioid substitution modality. Analysis of GARS as a predictor of opioid risk is underway. These study results have revealed solutions that can be directed to the treatment of RDS behaviors.

OMICS International Addiction Therapy-2014 International Conference Keynote Speaker Kathy Sexton-Radek photo
Biography:

Kathy Sexton-Radek, PhD, CBSM completed her Doctorate of Philosophy in the area of Clinical Psychology at Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago, IL in 1988. She interned at Rush Medical Center as a Behavioral Medicine Resident. She has been in academia for 26 years developing and teaching undergraduate and graduate psychology courses. Her private practice work as Director of Behavioral Health and Wellness for the last 26 years has focused on assessment and treatment in areas of sleep disorders, depression, anxiety disorders, somatic symptoms disorders and psychological factors affecting medical illness disorders. She is a Certified Behavioral Sleep Medicine specialist and has Sleep Board eligibility. \\\\r\\\\n\\\\r\\\\n

Abstract:

A summary of the behavioral interventions used to treat substance use disorder will be presented. The literature indicates efficacy with a number of approaches that are applied in the private practice and inpatient settings. The differences between the implementations of approaches will be discussed. Varying degrees of successful outcome exist by substance use disorder –substance type. The comparison to medical interventions will be made and areas of need will be identified. Finally, the some clinical impressions on future directions will be discussed.

Keynote Forum

Sara J. Nixon

University of Florida, USA

Keynote: Neurobehavioral challenges in recovery: Exploring their breadth & treatment implications

Time : 10:05-10:30

OMICS International Addiction Therapy-2014 International Conference Keynote Speaker Sara J. Nixon photo
Biography:

Sara Jo Nixon is Professor of Psychiatry and Psychology, Co-Vice Chair, Department of Psychiatry, Chief of Addiction Research, Director of the CTSI Biobehavioral Core and of the Neurocognitive Laboratory, all at the University of Florida. She has over 125 peer-reviewed articles and book chapters and has edited two books. She has made hundreds of scientific presentations and holds research awards from private, state and national sources: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, National Institute on Drug Abuse, Department of Veterans Affairs, and more. She is Past President of the Research Society on Alcoholism and the Society of Addiction Psychology.

Abstract:

Drawing on her own as well as others’ work, the author will provide an overview of current research addressing dysregulation and impairment in neurobehavioral systems associated with chronic substance abuse. Within this discussion, she will present provocative data regarding a common comorbidity among treatment-seekers, nicotine dependence and examine its acute and chronic effects. As a part of this overview, she will explore a critical, but understudied, component of neurobehavior, emotional processing; describing developing work designed to concurrently explore the two domains. Finally, the author will discuss developing treatment interventions applying our understanding of these deficits to enhance treatment compliance and long-term outcome.

Break: Coffee Break 10:30-10:50 @ Foyer

Keynote Forum

William S. Jacobs

University of Florida, USA

Keynote: Pain and addiction

Time : 10:50-11:15

OMICS International Addiction Therapy-2014 International Conference Keynote Speaker William S. Jacobs photo
Biography:

William S Jacobs, MD, is board certified in Anesthesiology, Pain Medicine, and Addiction Medicine. A Phi Beta Kappa, Magna Cum Laude University of Georgia undergraduate and graduate of the Medical College of Georgia, he did his Anesthesiology Residency at the University of Alabama-Birmingham before matriculating to UF for his Addiction Medicine Fellowship. He is currently Associate Professor in Psychiatry and Addiction Medicine: Co-Chief of Pain Medicine at the University of Florida. His work has included serving as Medical Director of multiple addiction treatment programs as well as expert witness work, consulting with state and federal agencies, authoring peer reviewed works and as on pharmacologic studies.

Abstract:

Background: Opioid abuse and dependence are significant health care provider health problems, and this is especially the case amongst anesthesia trainees and physicians. Methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) has been the most widely used maintenance treatment for decades in treating opiate addiction. But what about physician opioid addicts, even if they have identical intravenous or other elements of their history in common with other addicts do they receive the same treatment?
Methods: For 5 years, we followed all physicians who were identified by the Florida Board of Medicine and PRN for opioid abuse/dependence. Twenty-six physicians were identified in the pre-Buprenorphine era: all but ten had intravenous opioid use. They included 23 males and 3 females. Treatment referrals were made to various addiction treatment facilities and outcomes were collected.
Results: All signed PRN contracts requiring them to attend a specialized monitoring group, call a toll-free number for randomization to at least weekly urine monitoring and regularly attend a local recovery support group program. 0% were referred for MMT. 0/23 male addicts were treated with MMT. All were referred for detoxification and drug-free long-term physicians health program treatment and monitoring. As we have reported previously, physician addicts have a greater than 80% successful 5 year outcomes as assessed by written counselor reports, physician/psychiatrist evaluations, AA/NA attendance, return to work and frequent random urine testing.
Conclusion: Unlike treatment referrals for non-physicians, opioid addicted physicians are referred to detox and long-term treatment rather than MMT. Physicians may recommend MMT for others but an unusual NIMBY (not-in-my-backyard) phenomenon applies for their colleagues. The physicians behavior is to vote for detox and long-term treatment for themselves and colleagues and they may prefer this option to MMT if available for other opiate addicts.

Keynote Forum

John Femino

American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM), USA

Keynote: Coupling 12 Steps Program and Fellowship with Molecular Neurobiology: Don’t throw out the baby with the bath water

Time : 11:15-11:40

OMICS International Addiction Therapy-2014 International Conference Keynote Speaker John Femino photo
Biography:

John Femino, MD, FASAM, graduated from Brown University School of Medicine and completed residency in internal medicine and post-doctoral fellowships in clinical psychopharmacology and drug and alcohol abuse.He was the recipient of the Career Teacher in Alcohol and Drug Abuse grant at Brown University and was one of the first faculty members at the Brown University Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies, teaching in clinical faculty positions for the last 20 years. He has been on the board of directors of the Rhode Island Council on Alcoholism and has been the substance abuse consultant to major insurance companies in RI.In 1996, he founded Meadows Edge Recovery Center, a state licensed substance abuse treatment program and multidisciplinary medical and mental health group practice in North Kingstown, RI. He is a fellow of the American Society of Addiction Medicine, is board certified in internal medicine and addiction medicine and is certified as an MRO.He served as founding president of RISAM and is currently on the national ASAM Board of Directors as the New England Regional Director.He is currently a member of the Scientific Advisory of Dominion Diagnostics, LLC. RI. And is co-author of Springer Neuroscience Briefs “Molecular Neurobiology of Addiction Recovery: The 12 steps Program & Fellowship” (©2013).

Abstract:

The exploration of why 12 steps work for many has eluded the best scientific minds since its beginnings in 1933 as espoused by the “Big Book”. There have been many attempts by biological physicians to provide medical assistance to treat all addictive behaviors. Recently the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) has embraced a new definition of addiction to be based on pathological impairment of the brain reward circuitry. A subset of ASAM members known as “Like Minded Docs” are continuing their mission to couple psycho-social-spiritual modalities with evidence based psychopharmacology and genetics to assist in appropriate therapeutics and in-depth neurotransmitter genetic polymorphisms removing guess-work opening up a mirror to the brain of victims of Reward Deficiency Syndrome(RDS). Specifically this keynote address will describe the control mechanisms of addiction by utilizing AA slogans and sayings to illustrate alterations of reward circuitry and frontal lobe dysfunction on distortions of thinking, self- evaluation and choice. Through visual aids and simple to understand metaphors, Dr. Femino will link neuroimaging studies (fmRI, PET, Spec etc.) to illustrate both the genetics and pathophysiology of addiction and recovery. Coupling the neurobiological approach with understanding of the language of 12 step recovery step by step will not only laydown the foundation to be successful in patient recovery but will re-spark all those involved(e.g. clinicians, family , friends etc.). Acceptance of this proposed scientifically sound “coupling” should lead to a better quality of life for the patient during recovery-“redeeming joy” and happiness.

Keynote Forum

John J. Giordano

The National Institute Of Holistic Addiction Studies, USA

Keynote: Comprehensive holistic approaches in addiction medicine

Time : 11:40-12:05

OMICS International Addiction Therapy-2014 International Conference Keynote Speaker John J. Giordano photo
Biography:

John J. Giordano (Doctor Of Human Letters, CCJS, MAC, CAP) is an expert in the treatment of addiction and mental health and the founder of The National Institute For Holistic Addiction Studies (NIFHAS). He has nearly thirty years of recovery and twenty-eight years of addiction and mental health treatment. Giordano is the author of “Proven Holistic Treatment For Addiction & Chronic Relapse,” “How To Beat Your Addictions And live A Quality Life” and co-author of “Molecular Neurobiology of Addiction Recovery - The 12 Steps Program and Fellowship” Mr. Giordano has contributed to over sixty-five research papers published in peer-reviewed medical and scientific journals.

Abstract:

We are cognizant that addictive behaviors including alcohol and drugs present a rather high rate of relapse following treatment. To enhance treatment outcomes we developed a very comprehensive evidence –based neuroscience approach using many holistic modalities. These include but are not limited to nutrient induced reward circuitry rebalancing leading to dopaminergic homeostasis. Our program, also includes cognitive behavioral therapy, mild hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT), heavy metal toxicity monitoring, trauma release therapy, NLP, acupuncture, hypnotherapy, drumming, yoga, diet, exercise, music therapy, guided imagery, urine analysis monitoring, encouragement of 12 step program, fellowship attendance, family therapy and a strong aftercare program. Unlike other chemical treatment centers the neuroadaptagen supplements are treated like other medications and compliance monitoring is a key. One example of our continued interest in clinical outcome measures involved comparing patient demographics and relapse rates in our chemical dependence track. Increased risk for relapse and lower academic achievement were found to have a significant association in recent outcome data from a holistic treatment center (HTC) located in North Miami Beach, FL. Relapse outcomes from the Drug Addiction Treatment Outcome Study (DATOS) (n =1738) and HTC (n =224) were compared for a 12-month period. Post-discharge relapse was reported by 26% of HTC patients and 58% of patients in DATOS. Also found was a correlation between relapse and education level where the lower the academic performers showed the highest relapse rates. Our results implicate the use of vitamin and mineral supplements coupled with a well-researched natural dopamine agonist nutrient therapy; both have been shown to improve cognition and behavior, and thus academic achievement.

Break: Panel Discussion 12:05-12:45
  • Clinical Aspects of Addiction Studies
Location: Main Hall Northbrook Hilton Chicago
Speaker

Chair

Sara J. Nixon

University of Florida, USA

Speaker

Co-Chair

Thomas Simpatico

University of Vermont, USA

Session Introduction

Adi Jaffe

Alternatives Addiction Treatment, USA

Title: Not ashamed but still too poor - Longitudinal changes in barriers to treatment entry foronline treatment seekers

Time : 12:45-13:05

Speaker
Biography:

Adi Jaffe completed his Ph.D at from The University of California in Los Angeles and postdoctoral studies from UCLA’s Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior. He is the co-founder and executive director of research for Alternatives Addiction Treatment, a premier outpatient SUD treatment provider in Beverly Hills, California. He also founded and developed the first algorithm-driven SUD treatment-search tool that was used in the described study. He has published more than a dozen papers in reputed journals and serves on the editorial boards of a number of SUD journals.

Abstract:

Aims: To identify and recruit online treatment seekers and examine their treatment entry behavior and related barriers over a period of six months. A number of barriers to treatment entry have been previously identified for individuals either meeting criteria for substance use disorders (SUD) or actively seeking treatment. However, no longitudinal assessment of possible changes in such barriers has been published to date and no examination of such barriers has taken place specifically for those seeking treatment online. Methods: Online treatment seekers were recruited through an online SUD treatment finder after completing online screening, followed by eligibility determination and an online informed consent. Participants were then emailed links to online assessments, delivered via Survey Monkey, to be completed within 24 hours of initial screening and again at one-week, one-month, and six-months following initial screening. Results: Forty participants were recruited, presenting broad variability in gender (Female=60%), age (M=32, SD=8.6), and geography (10 states represented). The reported barriers to treatment entry at baseline replicated previous findings with stigma, shame, inability to share the problem, cost, and access, all presenting as significant barriers. Follow up assessments provided evidence of substantial shifts in barriers with stigma and shame becoming less prominent while cost and access increased in magnitude. Some differences based on gender, actual treatment-entryand past treatment experience were found. Conclusions: Treatment-seeking individuals report changes in the reasons for not entering treatment as they progress through the treatment-seeking process. While stigma and shame are substantial barriers at initial seeking they become less important as the treatment-seeking experience continues. Research into the process, through which some barriers become less obstructive for treatment entry and the role that online treatment- and information-seeking plays in this processcould help accelerate barriers removal and facilitate earlier SUD treatment entry.

Speaker
Biography:

Deborah Matteliano is a Nurse Practitioner and Certified Pain Management Specialist. She first worked in pain management as an Adult Nurse Practitioner treating co existing substance use disorders. She developed a customized treatment program for rehabilitation of persons with coexisting disorders. She received post graduate education at the University at Buffalo as a Family Nurse Practitioner, and a PhD in Nursing. Her expertise is in managing patients with chronic pain using a holistic approach to minimize risk of substance use disorders. She speaks nationally to clinicians and has served on national expert panels on mitigating risk of addictions when prescribing opioids. She has six recent publications on adherence monitoring to minimize addictions. She has a clinical pain practice in urban Buffalo, NY and is Adjunct Professor at the University at Buffalo, NY.

Abstract:

Adherence monitoring for prescription of opioid use is a clinical imperative for persons prescribed with opioids for chronic pain. This presentation provides an overview of the clinical application of universal precautions to reduce risk as advocated by Gourlay Heit and Almahrezi, (2005)with guidelines promoted through the American Pain Society.Clinical application of adherence monitoring as thetouchstone for recognizing increased risk will be discussed with a special emphasis on management of persons with coexisting substance use disorders. The urinedrug test in the context of key clinical indicators will be elaboratedon, recognizing the complexities of providing a compassionate, patientcentered approach. A structured adherence monitoring scheme for minimizing risk throughout the continuum of care will be presented.

Break: Lunch Break 13:25-14:15 @ Oaks
Speaker
Biography:

Lynda Sharrett-Field received her Bachelor of Science degree in Psychology from the University of Southern Indiana in 2008. She completed Master of Science degree in Experimental Psychology with expertise in behavioral neuroscience in 2010 and a Doctor of Philosophy degree in this discipline in 2013. She has extensive expertise in biochemical, surgical and behavioral approaches in the study of alcohol addiction and its treatment. Her publications reflect a focus on understanding how glucocorticoid hormone receptor systems are altered by alcohol exposure, employing both in vitro and in vivo models, and how these systems may be pharmacologically exploited in the treatment of alcohol dependence.

Abstract:

Glucocorticoid levels are markedly altered by acute and prolonged exposure to intoxicating doses of ethanol, yet the behavioral significance of these alterations are not fully understood. Prior work has shown that ethanol withdrawal associated cognitive deficits in mice can be reduced by acute administration of a glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist and we have also shown that chronic ethanol consumption increases the brain concentrations of corticosterone in rodents. Our in vitro work has shown that corticosterone increases alcohol withdrawal neurotoxicity and calcium accumulation in hippocampal neurons. Our current work focuses on the ability ofglucocorticoid antagonist drugs to reduce the behavioural consequences of alcohol withdrawal. Administration of one dose of the Type 2 GR antagonist, mifepristone, immediately after alcohol withdrawal, prevented the subsequent memory deficits in mice and significantly lowered withdrawal signs. Repeated doses of this drug, given torats during a 4-day binge alcohol treatment, substantially reduced the acute signs of alcohol withdrawal. We have also studied the effects of the mifepristone analogue, ORG34517 that is more selective and lacks progesterone antagonist action. This compound significantly reduced acute withdrawal signs in rats and memory deficits inmice when given prior to withdrawal from chronic alcohol treatment. As a whole, these findings suggest that GR may represent therapeutic targets to be exploited in the treatment of ethanol dependence.

Speaker
Biography:

Jesse Milby is currently a Professor of Psychology at University of Alabama at Birmingham. He persued his B.A., English in 1962 from Eastern Baptist College, St. Davids, PA, completed his PhD in 1968 with the subjects of clinical Psychology from University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL and did Post-docs from three different institutes from University of London Institute of Psychiatry (Behavior Therapy), Temple University, Eastern PA Psychiatric Institute (Behavior Therapy) & Johns Hopkins University (Clinical Psychopharm) during the period from 1977-2005. He also gain the acknowledgement for many peer reviewed publications.

Abstract:

To organize, explain, and consolidate a progressively expanding knowledge of human behavior, a path to an over-arching theory of behavior is proposed. The path utilizes Staats’ concept of Basic Behavioral Repertoire (BBR), suggesting methods by which it can be quantified. It couples this with the construct of State of Well Being (SWB), which is conceived to be either positive or negative with a varying intensity. This SWB type and intensity is proposed for each behavior in a person’s BBR. The BBR along with current space and time becomes predictor variables which limit probabilities of alternative behaviors by quantifying all variables in an equation. The equation predicts most probable behaviors at the nexus of space, time and behaviors currently available in the BBR. Precision is enhanced by specifying a current nexus State of Well Being (SWB) of Positive (Po) or Negative (Ng) type and intensities from +1.0 to -1.0, which is matched with the SWB where usual behavior from the BBR is emitted. An artificial repertoire is utilized to show how the equation derives most probable behaviors. The theory proposes preliminary empirical work to demonstrate how it can predict probabilistically, behaviors from the BBR for a nexus of different Space and Times. It proposes a path to be able to articulate with Kahneman, & Tversky a. (1979) Prospect Theory. Strengths and advantages of the path are offered to provide an over-arching quantitative logical structure to bridge disparate domains of psychological phenomena. The theory could have practical application in predicting shopping choices for locations, products and price. It could be useful for predicting routine behavioral locations, temporal epochs, and probable behaviors at levels above random chance values. Lastly, the theory’s modest strengths and limitations are discussed and for some limitations possible remedial solutions are suggested.

Break: 15:55-16:30 Poster Presentations @ Oaks

15:35-15:55 Coffee Break @ Foyer

Cynthia Stuhlmiller

University of New England, Australia

Title: Harm reduction, new recovery and addiction therapy

Time : 16:30-16:50

Speaker
Biography:

Cynthia Stuhlmiller is Professor of Rural Nursing at the University of New England School of Health in Armidale Australia. She has been a joint appointment professor for over 17 years at 8 Universities in 5 countries. Her clinical work is in mental health and CBT self-help applications.

Abstract:

Harm minimization is the long standing philosophy underpinning national and state drug strategies in Australia. This public health approach is founded on three pillars of 1) reducing the supply of harmful substances, 2) reducing the demand for their use, and 3) reducing the health-related harm associated with use of drugs. To date, supply reduction has been shown to be complicated, expensive, and ineffective. Demand reduction, or programs aimed to discourage people from wanting drugs, has been shown to work best for those who need them least. There is however strong evidence to support the beneficial effects of harm reduction approaches in decreasing morbidity and mortality by abating spread of HIV and hepatitis C infection. Harm reduction focuses first on reducing the negative consequences of drug use, rather than promoting abstinence. From this paradigm it is argued that programs should be available to help keep addicted people as safe as possible. Yet to what extend has this approach treated addition or reduced the harm created by continuation of addiction and its progression? A “new recovery” approach for addictions is taking hold in United States, United Kingdom and now Australia. New recovery recognises that “interventions to combat complex behavioural difficulties need more holistic responses, and far better co-ordination of a range of government and community services, particularly at grass-roots levels. Recovery pathways are contingent upon matters such as housing, work, access to education, child welfare, protection of vulnerable people, health services more generally and the ability to meaningfully participate in communities”. In Australia, new recovery has been met with controversy by the harm reduction community. This presentation will outline the key issues and concerns of harm reduction and new recovery as they relate to addition therapy and engage the participants in debate. A case example of a needle syringe program in Australia will be used to highlight the relevant points.

Elizabeth Halpern

Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Title: Traditions and punishments: the white rum of the sailor and the whisky of the commander

Time : 17:10-17:30

Speaker
Biography:

Elizabeth Halpern is a Psychologist and a Frigate-Commander of the Brazilian Navy, a specialist in Medical Psychology, a Master in Collective Health, and a PhD in Mental Health. She dedicated 28 years in the Brazilian Navy hospitals and outpatient clinics, working as a chief and therapist, from prevention to rehabilitation, giving lectures and courses to military personnel, assisting families, couples, adolescents, and children, in groups and individually. As the Chief of the Center for Chemical Dependency during the last decade, she dedicated her practice towards addiction, and published 15 articles related to drinking practices in the workplace.

Abstract:

Alcoholism became a matter of special concern in Brazilian Navy since the establishment of the Center for Chemical Dependency (CEDEQ), in 1997. Despite the extent of the naval organization measures, from prevention to rehabilitation, this is the first study concerning the influence of the naval workplace in the production of alcoholism amongst the military contingent. The overall objective was to investigate the influence of the naval institution in the construction of alcohol dependency of CEDEQ’s patients, particularly the aspects related to naval traditions in favor of beverage consumption in their daily labor. The socio-anthropological method and its theoretical references were used, developing from three units of analysis. At first, from 2005 up to 2009, the ethnographic method was used, through participant observation, concerning the general aspects about how this outpatient clinic functions; in 2010, a participant observation was conducted during 24 sessions, in two therapeutic groups, each of them consisting of about ten members. In the second one, interviews were made with 13 patients who attended two treatment groups. In the third unit, in 2010, a single-case and explanatory study was made in order to construct a history of life and work through interviews with one patient. The results revealed the existence of three fundamental constructs that permeated all the results: the alcoholic habitus, sailors’ duties and sailors’ sociabilities. The alcoholic habitus refers to internalized patterns of behaviors, attitudes, and thoughts associated to ways of drinking, mainly collectively; the sailors’ duties refer to work-related experiences peculiar to naval life, whose characteristics may contribute to the onset of alcohol dependence; the sailors’ sociabilities are characterized by manners of consuming beverages, usually in group, associated with the execution of naval tasks. The results indicated that the construction of the patients` alcoholism has a sociocultural component and that drinking on board tend to be a learned tradition, considering the existence of: drinking opportunities and easy access to drinks; norms supporting consumption, particularly in the workplace; naval traditions that, continuously and subtly, disseminate beliefs and myths in favor of the presence of alcohol in labor journey; and an ambivalent position of the organization that encourages and prohibits alcoholic beverages on board, applying administrative and punitive measures, without clear criteria. It was concluded that the patients' behaviors related to alcohol consumption may indicate the existence of an uneasiness, a way to express an incompatibility before the military model, as well as the values, principles, and military regulations. Although the results cannot be generalized to other groups besides CEDEQ, they should motivate the realization of further investigation to encompass other members of this institution. Since Brazilian Navy has a crew of about 59,600 men, while a little over 50 people are treated in CEDEQ, a hidden demand must exist. Finally, it is expected that this research encourages the assessment of the situation of alcohol drinking in the workplace to implement protective measures on behalf of the workers and the navy organization.

Sarah Herremans

Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Belgium

Title: The effect of HF-rTMS on cue-reactivity in detoxified alcohol

Time : 17:30-17:50

Speaker
Biography:

Sarah C Herremans is a psychiatrist at the University Hospital of Brussels, Belgium. She graduated as a medical doctor at the Free University of Brussels in 2006, after which she specialized in psychiatry. She graduated as a psychiatrist and started her PhD in 2011. Her field of research concerns the application of HF-rTMS in alcohol dependent patients.

Abstract:

Different neuromodulation techniques such as repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) are now being investigated for their ability to treat addiction. In alcohol dependent patients, high frequency (HF)-rTMS is able to reduce alcohol craving, an important risk factor in relapse. However, the neurobiological effect of HF-rTMS in such patients is poorly understood. To address some of these unresolved questions we conducted a brain imaging study in a sample of recently detoxified alcohol dependent patients who underwent fifteen HF-rTMS sessions at the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. The effect of stimulation was evaluated by means of an alcohol-related cue-exposure during fMRI. Results and implications of this study will be discussed.

Break: Panel Discussion 17:50-18:00
Speaker
Biography:

Sarah E Cavanaugh, PhD received her doctorate in microbiology and immunology from Drexel University College of Medicine. She researches and performs critical analyses of animal models of alcohol addiction and related conditions with the hope of improving the translation potential of alcohol-related research to human patients.

Abstract:

The presentation lecture will explain about the overlap between alcohol addiction and mental illness, and the need for more specialized research regarding this patient population. Alcohol use disorders remain a substantial public health concern, due to the many physical, psychological, and social effects of alcohol abuse. Harmful drinking contributes to disorders of all major organ systems, development of several cancers, and leads to over 2.5 millions deaths in the United States every year. Infectious diseases such as HIV and other sexually transmitted infections have been linked to alcohol abuse, likely due to both risky behavior and alcohol-induced suppression of the immune system.

Break: 18:20-19:00 Cocktails sponsored by Journal of Alcoholism & Drug Dependence @ Oaks